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Current Issue : 2009 Spring

David Liederman '75 / DJ Resraurant Group, Inc.

Like her trailblazing culinary peers, Jacobson created a company based on more than a desire to make a profit. Feed Your Soul is a business with heart. "From the outset, giving back was my goal," she says. To that end, three percent of proceeds from cookie sales are donated to the charity of the customer's choice.

Jacobson now has a retail store in downtown Jersey City, and produces a full line of supermarket cookies, which are baked to the tune of 150,000 cookies a week, out of her East Rutherford kitchen. Today, you can buy her cookies online (www.feedyoursoul.biz), at her shop, or in any Dean and Deluca, West Side Market, Amish Markets, Fairway, or Kings, and you can find them at boutique hotels like the W.

While Jacobson never actually practiced law, she says she uses her education every day. "It's not just about the occupation; it's all about learning how to think. It's really helped me tremendously in my business," she says. "It's important to follow your dreams, but be smart about them. You can have the best product in the world, but if you don't sell it well and you don't protect yourself, you have nothing. The law made me a much more paranoid business owner, but it also made me successful."

The Cookie that Changed the World

Interestingly, Jacobson is not the first Brooklyn Law graduate to make a living off of cookies. She was preceded by David Liederman '75, the David of David's Cookies. Liederman, who explains that his love of cooking was born from his love of eating, went to Brooklyn Law School by day and NY Tech culinary school by night. After a stint cooking at the Michelin-starred Troisgros in France, it became increasingly clear to Liederman that his life would be about cooking, not advocating. When he returned from a life-altering trip to France, he practiced law for three months before beginning a career in food. It didn't take him long to hit it big.

He started his groundbreaking cookie shop featuring oven-fresh cookies made with real butter and loads of Swiss chocolate chunks in 1979, the same year he opened his nouvelle cuisine restaurant, Manhattan Market. In his spare time, he wrote two books, one a business advice book titled Running Through Walls (1989), and the second, a cookbook with freelance writer Joan Schwartz Liederman, David's Delicious Weight Loss Program (1990), a how-to book that detailed the low-fat, low-cholesterol diet that allowed him to lose 100 pounds.

“It’s important to follow your dreams, but be smart about them. You can have the best product in the world, but if you don’t sell it well and you don’t protect yourself, you have nothing. The law made me a much more paranoid business owner, but it also made me successful.”
— Mya Jacobson