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    01.03.13 Federal Bar Association Honors Judge Glasser ’48 and Judge Spatt ’49 for Service During World War II
    world judges

    On December 5, at the American Airpower Museum, Hon. I. Leo Glasser '48 and Hon. Arthur D. Spatt '49 were among five federal judges honored by the Federal Bar Association, Eastern District Chapter for their service during World War II. The three other judges honored at the ceremony were Hon. Leonard D. Wexler, Hon. Thomas C. Platt, and Hon. Jack B. Weinstein, who previously taught at Brooklyn Law School.

    Born in New York City in 1924, Judge Glasser graduated from the City College of New York in 1943 and then served in the United States Army as a tech corporal with the 796th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion. Judge Glasser landed in Europe a few weeks after D-Day at the small French town of St. Mere Englise. His unit pushed east, eventually crossing into Germany in the spring of 1945. He was awarded a Bronze Star before returning to the U.S. and attending Brooklyn Law School.

    After graduating in 1948, he served on the faculty of the Law School until 1969, when he was appointed a judge of the New York Family Court. He returned to Brooklyn Law School in 1977 to serve as its dean, a position he held until 1981 when he was nominated for the federal bench. He assumed senior status on July 1, 1993.

    Born in Brooklyn in 1925, Judge Spatt was a Navigation Petty Officer in the United States Navy on the USS Sherburne, an amphibious transport ship in the Pacific, from 1944 to 1946. The vessel was once attacked by Japanese kamikaze pilots, but sailed into Tokyo Bay as part of the flotilla of U.S. ships in September 1945, coinciding with Japan’s formal surrender. He was awarded the Asiatic Pacific Medal with Star and the Philippine Liberation Medal. “It was thrilling to see,” Judge Spatt told Newsday in an article about his service.

    Following his service, Judge Spatt enrolled in Brooklyn Law School and graduated in 1949. He went into private practice in New York City from 1949 until 1978. He was then appointed as a state court judge in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, Tenth Judicial District from 1978 to 1982, then an Administrative Judge of Nassau County, New York from 1982 to 1986, and an Associate Justice of the New York Appellate Division, Second Judicial Department, from 1986 to 1989. He was nominated to the federal bench in 1989 and assumed senior status in 2004.

    “Your accomplishments in uniform and in the courtroom, as well as your unique place in history is and will remain proudly remembered by our nation, our legal community and the Federal Bar Association,” said program chair Robert Rando.

BLS LawNotes Fall 2014

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